HOW CAN YOU BUILD A SUSTAINABLE
FUTURE FOR YOUR MUSEUM?
         MUSEUM CONSULTANT, CAROL SCOTT, USES AN INSTITUTION'S VALUE TO ACHIEVE MAXIMUM IMPACT WITH STAKEHOLDERS AND THE PUBLIC.
Carol Scott

This week, Jim Cullen talks about Public Value in action!

Carol Scott - Tuesday, December 02, 2014

Last summer I was commissioned to work with the Sir Alexander Galt Museum and Archives (The Galt) in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada on a ‘public value plan’. The Galt is a publicly-owned and funded multi-disciplinary museum and archives focused on the rich history and culture of Lethbridge and Southern Alberta.  

A number of compelling factors present challenges and offer opportunities for The Galt to be of service to the local community in the coming decade. Lethbridge expects ‘boom’ economic growth through oil and gas activity and expanded industrial agriculture. The Galt also expects significantly-increased diversity in its community driven by industrial expansion and growth in urban First Nations, elderly and student populations. How to respond? What public value can The Galt contribute?

A key success factor in our project was The Galt’s ethos. It has an existing commitment to public value principles, a strong track record in community engagement, a passion for telling community stories through a diverse exhibition program and events, and an embedded habit of strategic thinking.  In many ways, The Galt was a dream client for this kind of work!

Carol’s book was our primary source of guidance for a public value-guided ‘mashup’ of my existing strategic planning framework. We were also guided by the Alberta Museums Association Sustainability Working Group’s five ‘Facets of Sustainability[1] and a number of other internationally-published works including AAM’s Trendswatch.

Museum staff began the process with a quick, but robust stakeholder engagement process which focused on each stakeholder’s insights into the direction, needs and issues of the Lethbridge and Southern Alberta community in relation to their own organizations. We distilled this information to find recurring themes across all stakeholders.  Stakeholder feedback, combined with the Galt Planning Team’s own visioning of community trends and issues profoundly informed the plan’s development and content. 

My strategic planning work has long made use of Appreciative Inquiry[2] and ‘SOAR’[3] methods to encourage generative thinking. We found that SOAR worked beautifully with public value concepts. As a Recognized Museum in Alberta, The Galt was already accustomed to rigorous review of its core museum operations and we were able to re-purpose our internal analysis of standard museum functions to focus on the public value capabilities which would be needed to support this fundamental strategic direction. 

The Planning Team reviewed and re-interpreted their existing mission and vision statements through a public value lens and focused on value propositions and community and visitor outcomes.

In the end, we met the project’s scope and timing requirements and developed a strategic plan worthy of this remarkable institution; the plan was approved by the Galt’s Board with few amendments.  It was thrilling to work with such a public value-savvy team and to see how public value thinking could energize and bring vastly greater meaning to the strategic planning process.   As a consultant, my strategic planning process now is driven even more deeply by public value concepts. 

[1] Cultural, Health, Environmental, Financial and Social Sustainability.  See http://www.museums.ab.ca/media/34750/museumsswg_report_final.pdf

[2] Cooperrider, Whitney and Stavros, found at: http://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu

[3] Strengths, Opportunities, Aspirations, Results.  See http://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu/practice/executiveDetail.cfm?coid=5331

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